Tag Archives: watering

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Topdressing and Overseeding Your Lawn

Topdressing, Overseeding & Fertilizing your Lawn in the Fall

It is ideal to topdress (spread soil) your lawn once a year. If you topdressed in the spring, than just overseed and fertilize at this time of year (the fall).

Even if your lawn is looking healthy and green, still topdress, seed and fertilize – don’t wait until it stops looking great before you follow the steps below.  By keeping up on your lawn every year, you’ll have less weeds, disease and insects invade – and less stress! If it all seems like too much, just overseed – overseed, overseed, overseed! I know some people that overseed every month and their lawn is nice and thick and healthy.

Below we have listed the easy steps to topdress, seed and fertilize your lawn.

  1. Rake lawn with either hard rake or fan rake and discard dead grass to compost – if lawn is long – cut grass to 1” high (this makes topdressing easier)
  2. Topdress lawn with soil, spreading it out no more than ¼” deep over existing lawn area
  3. Spread seed evenly over lawn (be sure to keep it out of the gardens)
  4. Fertilize lawn with an organic fertilizer (use a spreader, do not spread by hand)
  5. Water entire area in each section for 20 minutes. Keep area moist but not soaking until seed has germinated (likely 6-10 days depending on the weather and your watering practices)
  6. You might have to seed some areas you missed after germination has occurred
  7. When cutting your lawn – wait until the grass has grown 6″ and set the mower to its highest setting and keep it there all season long to encourage deep rooting of your lawn.

Watch our quick video below for a how-to on topdressing and overseeding – sorry about the vehicle noise and the agitated Mike – this is why we keep him out of the greenhouse and off the cash registers!!

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Planting, Transplanting and Dividing

Planting, Transplanting and Dividing

When planting, transplanting or dividing plants it is vital to use a transplant fertilizer. We use Acti-sol Transplater 4-10-2. It is made of pure hen manure and bone meal.  It is ideal for planting and transplanting all types of plants as the hen manure acts rapidly to stimulate root development and the bone meal breaks down slowly for medium and long term action. A plant will not push any crown growth until it is firmly established.

Planting

You can plant at any time of the year, as long as you can dig a hole (so you can’t plant when the ground is frozen).  The most important thing about planting is watering – and not just watering once…water, water, water – water lots especially during the plant’s first year.  Trees need up to 15 gallons (that’s 57 litres) of water a week, shrubs need up to 10 gallons (that’s 38 litres) a week.  The easiest way to water is taking a 5 gallon pail, drill a couple of holes in the bottom, set it beside the plant you are watering, and fill it up – it will slowly empty, giving the plant a nice deep water.  Repeat this a few times a week depending on how much water your plant needs.

This is a great video on how to water using the bucket method.

Also, keep watering your plants until the ground freezes. Plants need nice moist roots going into the long dry winter.

Transplanting

Transplanting plants is a little different than planting potted plants. When transplanting, for the most part, we do not want to move the plant while it is in bloom or during it’s growth time. Move the plant either really early spring or late fall (depending on it’s blooming and active growth time). It is expected that there will be some root loss and damage when moving a plant so plants moved in the heat of summer is discouraged. Damaged roots will not always be able to absorb sufficient water for the whole plant so cutting back the tops is sometimes necessary to keep it hydrated and cool – if possible try to move the plants in cooler wetter weather.

Transplanting offers the ability to redesign your gardens without having to buy any new product. A fresh new look, accentuating different plants and bringing attention to some of your more hidden specimens at a moments notice keeps your yard looking fresh and new.

Dividing Perennials 

As a rule of thumb divide and move perennials in the cooler weather and remember: spring bloomers in the fall and fall bloomers in the spring.

Dividing perennials is a rewarding though finicky gardening adventure. Dividing plants is a great way to scale back some of the more vigorous growers keeping your garden from looking overgrown and unkempt. It is good for controlling plant growth, smaller plants are most often more vigorous bloomers than their larger leafier selves. When managing our gardens that is our goal, emphasis plant blooming and manage our space. When using a spade to separate clusters use rubbing alcohol to clean the spades cutting edge to reduce the risk of disease transmission.

Below is a great article on dividing perennials: when, which ones and how. Check it out!

http://www.finegardening.com/10-tips-dividing-perennial-plants

Check out our video on dividing hostas – the general concept of dividing hostas can be used on many other perennials as well.