Tag Archives: flowers

Soil Is Soil… Right?

Soil is soil…right?!

‘Tis the time of year for buying new soil for your yard, garden and pots (indoor and out), so what better time to learn the difference between the different types of soil we offer!

Many people don’t know that there is a difference between types of soil and that it really does matter what type of soil you use for different projects.

I think some of it has to do with the fact people are trying to save a buck and a bit of their time, as both are hard to come by, and if they just get one type of soil it will save them time and money. Besides, soil is soil, right? NO!

I always say to customers, you’re spending the money on the plant buy the right soil for it otherwise it all is a waste of time and money!

There are also quite a few people that don’t know that the problem they’re having is because of their soil (their plants keep dying or not preforming how they’d like them to)!

So…

Top soil

Top soil is straight soil with nothing mixed with it.
It is good for using under sod and any other lawn application.  It can be used for topdressing but topdresser is better and easier to apply. Do not use top soil in pots.

georgina garden centre top soil bulk products

Triple Mix

Triple mix is made up of: top soil, manure and peat moss.
It is good for planting in the ground and can be used throughout the garden.
Triple mix helps to break up heavy clay soils and is good to add to sandy soils. Do not use triple mix in pots.

georgina garden centre triple mix bulk products

Garden Soil

Good garden soil contains a combination of: black soil, organic matter, peat moss and horticultural sand.
Garden soil can also be used on the lawn. Don’t limit your lawn soil to just top soil or topdresser, your grass needs as much rich nutrient soil as your garden does!
Garden soil is heavier than potting soil, retains some moisture, and has less air space than potting soil. Do not use garden soil in pots!

**Top soil, topdreser, triple mix & garden soil are for the lawn and/or garden – not pots or containers. They all hold more water than potting soil and does not have the type of drainage that plants in pots need. Your plants will get bogged down over time and will lag behind and could die.**

Potting Soil

As the name states: potting soil is for pots (and containers).  Good potting soil is usually soilless with a combination of: organic matter, perlite, vermiculite and horticultural sand.  It is light and holds water well and has great drainage. There should be a lot of air-space in it.

Soil that contains fertilizer

Buying soil with fertilizer already in it is not necessary and could be a waste of the few extra dollars it costs. If you have container grown before, you would have noticed that when you water your pots, a lot of water comes out the bottom, so does all the nutrients. Buying a good quality potting soil and fertilizing regularly is sufficient for your container plants for the season!

georgina garden centre gardening tips

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How to Turn Hydrangeas Blue

How to Turn Hydrangeas Blue

hydrangea rio

To get that rich blue hydrangea colour in your garden that everyone loves is easier than you think.

If your hydrangeas are supposed to be blue but are pink, you’ll need to add Aluminum Sulphate to the soil.  Adding aluminum sulphate is necessary to change the pH of the soil to help make it more acidic. You can only change hydrangeas blue that are supposed to be blue (i.e. you can’t change white ones to blue) and this process only works on big-leaf hydrangeas (Hydrangea macrophylla).

hydrangea starlight 2

Changing the pH of the soil to the ideal pH 4.5 to 5.5 levels can take more than one season depending on your starting conditions. Start applying aluminum sulphate in the spring as soon as it starts to warm up, once a month until the blooms are open. You can also add pine needles, mulch and/or leaves to help add natural acidity to the soil as they break down.

hydrangea rhythmic blue

Click here to learn how and when to prune your hydrangeas to get the most blooms?

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My Hydrangea isn’t Flowering – HELP?!

A question we get asked a lot is: “Why aren’t my hydrangeas blooming?” Kathy, the host of Georgina Blooms, also gets asked this question a lot – so she asked if we’d do a show with her to teach everyone how easy it is to get your hydrangeas to bloom!

There could be many reasons such as, not enough light, too much light, not enough fertilizer, too much fertilizer, not the right fertilizer, BUT quite often it comes down to PRUNING!! – an easy fix!

How and when to prune hydrangeas. Each cultivar is slightly different so, here it is, all in one spot, easy to follow!!

 

Hydrangea arborescens

These hydrangeas form their flowers buds in the late spring to early summer.

Prune in late fall, winter or early spring. They respond well to being cut back to about 10″-12″ above the ground.

georgina garden centre features annabelle hydrangea shrubs

Cultivars:

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Hydrangea macrophylla

Big Leaf Hydrangeas typically do not require too much pruning. If you would like a tighter plant or keep it a shorter size, keep reading!

The flower buds form later in the summer for next year’s blooms. The best time to prune it is right after it blooms, from mid-July to mid-August – no later – this gives it time to set bud for next year before the winter hits. Selectively prune out any dead stems, or old non-flower producing stems.

georgina garden centre features hydrangea let's dance shrub

Cultivars:

  • Candlelight
  • City Line Mars
  • City Line Paris
  • City Line Rio
  • Bloomstruck
  • Blushing Bride
  • Endless Summer
  • Everlasting ‘Ocean’
  • Everlasting ‘Opal’
  • Everlasting ‘Harmony’
  • Everlasting ‘Garnet’
  • Everlasting ‘Revolution’
  • Forever and Ever
  • Forever Pink
  • Glowing Embers
  • Let’s Dance Rhapsody Blue
  • Let’s Dance Moonlight
  • Let’s Dance Big Easy
  • Let’s Dance Starlight
  • Let’s Dance Diva
  • Light O Day
  • Masja
  • Merritt’s Beauty
  • Nikko Blue
  • Next Generation Red Sensation
  • Next Generation Pistachio
  • Sweet ‘n Salsa
  • Tellers Blue
  • Tiny Tuff Stuff (actually a Hydrangea serrata, however, they have the same pruning techniques)
  • Tuff Stuff (actually a Hydrangea serrata, however, they have the same pruning techniques)

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Hydrangea paniculata

They bloom on new wood and are best pruned in early spring. They are very tolerant of hard pruning, in fact cutting the plant back from 1/2 to 1/3 of it’s size will result in larger flowers. They can also be pruned in the winter but why not enjoy the beauty of snow on the dried flower heads – birds love them too. Some selections, particularly Limelight, make an beautiful hedge.

Cultivars:

  • Bobo
  • Bombshell
  • Fire and Ice
  • Firelight
  • Limelight
  • Little Lamb
  • Little Lime
  • Little Quick Fire
  • Pee Gee
  • Phantom
  • Pink Diamond
  • Pinky Winky
  • Silver Dollar
  • Snow Mountain
  • Sweet Summer
  • Quick Fire
  • Unique
  • Vanilla Strawberry

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Hydrangea anomala

No need to prune – May need to train it on a tree or a wall

georgina garden centre features climbing hydrangea vines

Cultivars:

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Many of our Hydrangeas are Proven Winners…check out the pictures below to see a good selection of them and others!

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